Pet Calendar: 7 Goals For A More Optimistic Month

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March has been designated Optimism Month. Those of us who live with pets understand the joy they bring to our lives on a daily basis. They can lift our spirits. Pets provide unconditional love and devotion. They ask for nothing, but give so much.

If you’re looking for a way to celebrate Optimism Month and set goals for a better new year (and even though it’s March, there is no reason to not to set goals for this month and the rest of the year! See how optimistic I am about that!?) (Read seven goals below)

optimism month pet calendar

Pet Calendar: 7 Goals For A More Optimistic Month

  1. Adopt a new pet. If you have been thinking about adding a new furry or feathered or finned family member, check with a rescue or adoption group or a shelter first. There are rescue groups for virtually any kind of pet you want to share your life with.
  2. Go back to school! If you’re a pet lover and want to be more involved with pets, consider getting a veterinary degree. You can take an online veterinary technician course through Ashworth College. If you have a passion for pets, becoming a veterinary technician will give you the opportunity to work with them on a daily basis and earn a living! The programs at Ashworth College are considered one of the most affordable online programs and give graduates the skills and knowledge sought by veterinary practices, research facilities and other pet care facilities.
  3. Become a pet sitter. If you love pets, but can’t have them — because you travel a lot or because where you live doesn’t allow them, consider being a pet sitter. These professionals stay in the homes of families who need someone to care for their pets while they are out of town or at work. Interacting with a pet, even for a few hours a day as a pet sitter, will certainly boost your mood!
  4. Volunteer at a shelter to walk the dogs or scoop litter boxes. Shelters are typically understaffed and overworked and would welcome a volunteer who will play with the dogs and take them for walks. You will be brightening the mood and life of a shelter pet and that will certainly make you more optimistic!
  5. Get your dog trained. If you have an unruly pup, he will benefit from a training or socialization class. I speak from experience: We have an almost-one-year-old Goldendoodle and he needs a training class. We have tried to train him on our own with limited success. He will be attending a training class to learn to walk on a leash, listen to our commands to not bark, to generally become a better citizen in our household. We know that he needs a “job” and he is eager to please — he is a praise-motivated pup — and would thrive in a training setting.
  6. Undertake a DIY project for feral cats. If you live in an area that has a lot of — or even a few — feral cats, look on Pinterest for some DIY shelters for the ferals to keep them safe from the winter elements. These shelters are also helpful for ferals in areas of the country where the temperatures hit the triple digits.
  7. Live life like your pets do. Take some time today to truly watch your pets. Do they stress about anything? Sure if they have to go out and go potty and you don’t respond quickly enough, they may dance around, but for the most part your pets are happy. They are happy when you pet them. They are happy when you feed them. They are happy when they play with their toys. See where I am going with this? Your pets are true optimists. We could all take a page from their books and live like they do. Be happy for every little moment you have!

What can you do to be more optimistic? We’d love to hear!

This is a sponsored conversation written by me on behalf of Ashworth College . The opinions and text are all mine.

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Larry Kay is the award-winning coauthor of Training the Best Dog Ever, which became a #1 best seller in dog training on Amazon Kindle. He is Leader of the Pack at Positively Woof, which helps shelter dogs get adopted by making videos and raises awareness and funds. Larry is an award-winning dog filmmaker and has been a frequent contributor to the American Animal Hospital Association and Dog Fancy magazine.